Archive for the ‘Tweet Summary’ Category

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

November 17, 2015 5 comments

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments. Plus…sign up to receive notice when my book is published! The title of the book is What’s Wrong with Money?: The Biggest Bubble of All, and if you would like to be on the notification list to receive an email when the book is published, simply send an email to You can also pre-order online.

  • +0.2% on core CPI…as expected…waiting for breakdown
  • With Median CPI running 2.5% as of last month, we should be expecting 0.2% as the “normal” core going fwd.
  • 20% was core to 2 decimal places. 1.91% y/y. [ed note: mistweeted as 0.19% first]
  • Note that the next two months, we roll off +0.08% and +0.06% from last year. This means core will be about 2.2% by dec CPI.
  • (Though there’s some evidence of missed seasonality in core CPI these days, through airfares e.g.)
  • Primary Rents 3.74% vs 3.71%. OER unch at 3.09%. So Housing roughly unch at 2.12% y/y
  • Medicinal drugs 2.95%, up a bit, but Hospital Services 4.87% vs 3.28% and Health Insurance 2.99% vs 1.74%.
  • No big surprise that there’s a jump in medical care services if you’ve looked at your bills recently! Probably not temporary.
  • core services at +2.8% mainly due to medical; core goods -0.7%, weakest since Jan.
  • Apparel -1.91% vs -1.37%, a non-negligible part of core goods.
  • New vehicles also soft: +0.14% from +0.47%. Some will say this is a VW effect, but also a general dollar effect.
  • The dollar effect, overall, is very small but in a few categories like Apparel it is large and in cars it is measurable.
  • First cut at Median, looks to me like ~0.21%, unchanged at 2.5% y/y. That’s the number that matters but not due out for hours.
  • I think I mistweeted the core to 2 decimal places…was 0.20%, not 0.19%. still 1.91% y/y, I just typoed. Why? It’s a mistwee. [ed note: har har!]
  • Summary is there’s still no sign of deflation! The pop in medical services inflation joins housing as concerns to the upside.
  • The rise in Medical care will also tend to make PCE catch back up with core, since it has 3x the weight in PCE as in CPI.
  • I don’t care about PCE, but the Fed does.

There is not a lot here to be very happy about if you want the Fed to stay on hold. The best argument for the Fed to not tighten, at this point, is that it doesn’t wanna. Growth isn’t great, and is weakening, and we may well enter a recession in a few months (we won’t know that for a year, of course, when the NABE announces it). But that won’t stop inflation from rising. Money supply growth is still rolling along at 6.7% (the highest in 15 months), but the Fed doesn’t really care about that as far as anyone can tell. At this point, the argument for the Fed to move is strong, but it has been almost this strong for a couple of years (and arguably stronger, when growth was less tenuous a year or two ago). The only argument that is stronger now is that they are even further behind the curve.

However, I am still skeptical that the Fed will tighten in December. They need to walk back their rhetoric, and I expect they will do so over the next few weeks (if they do not, then I am wrong and they will tighten in December). Even if they tighten, though, I do not expect them to tighten more than a couple of token times, before slowing growth makes them ‘pause’ – and that will be an interminable pause.

One chart here that is the most disturbing of the report: medical care services.


If you have been shopping for healthcare recently, you know that there are steep increases in insurance (which doesn’t show up very much in CPI but is more meaningful in PCE) and direct services that you pay prior to using up your deductible are also rising significantly. Medical care is a mess. For a while, the reorganization of payment streams hid the actual increased costs of Obamacare, but the real costs are starting to be felt. It may be that the cost curve eventually turns down because consumers have to pay for more of the care themselves. But this hasn’t happened yet, and it will take time. In the meantime, medical care services will add to housing services as the main pressures for higher prices.

It’s only softness in goods prices that is holding down overall core CPI now, and that won’t last forever!

Categories: CPI, Tweet Summary

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

October 15, 2015 Leave a comment

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments. Plus…sign up to receive notice when my book is published! The title of the book is What’s Wrong with Money?: The Biggest Bubble of All, and if you would like to be on the notification list to receive an email when the book is published, simply send an email to You can also pre-order online.

  • core CPI +0.21%, higher than expected. y/y core to 1.89%.
  • core services up to 2.7%; core goods remains at -0.5%
  • The rise in core CPI #inflation is no surprise to anyone watching Median. But a surprise to many apparently.
  • Owners’ Equiv (3.09% from 3.02%), Primary Rent (3.71% v 3.62%), Lodging Away from Home (1.94% v 1.69%).
  • Overall housing 2.12% vs 2.02% last month. All in keeping with established trends and unsurprising; this has further to go.
  • Medical Care approx unch (2.45% y/y); Recreation unch (0.64%); Apparel down slightly.
  • within Medical, medical drugs decelerated to 2.9% from 3.5%, but professional services and health insurance counteracted that.
  • Core #inflation ex-housing up to 1% vs 0.9%. That’s low but highest it has been since last July.
  • Worth pointing out: derivatives markets are pricing core CPI to be below 1.5%, compounded, for 8yrs. It’s above that now.
  • …and implied core for the next year is below zero (even after today’s rally so far). Core deflation is not happening.
  • US (headline) #Inflation mkt pricing: 2015 0.5%;2016 1.3%;then 1.6%, 1.7%, 1.7%, 1.8%, 2.0%, 2.1%, 2.2%, 2.3%, & 2025:2.3%.
  • So Fed, what do you believe? the market or your own lying eyes? They’re focused on headline now so their deflation worries persist.
  • This is a fun chart. Note that about half of the weight of CPI is inflating >3%. But 12% is deflating.


  • That’s why median matters.
  • Warning: Back of the envelope on Median CPI suggests chance of +0.3%; would imply Median would go to post-crisis high near 2.5%.
  • My back-of-the-envelope lacks seasonal adjustment for regional housing indices but it has been pretty close recently.
  • Cleveland Median CPI +0.3%, +2.5% y/y. QED.
  • inflation is now officially higher than it has been since 2009, on the way down.
  • And Fed to continue to do nothing about it.
  • Median CPI thru this month. In line with what we have been forecasting. Any questions?


At 2.5%, median inflation is not only at or above the equivalent level on core PCE, given historical spreads, but also is clearly rising as the chart above shows. However, this Fed believes very strongly that inflation cannot go up if the economy is slowing, despite generations’ worth of counterevidence (the 1970s, anyone?). The economy does seem to be slowing, not just domestically but globally. Therefore, whether the Fed thinks Median CPI is relevant or not, they will continue to focus on headline inflation numbers that flirt with deflation because of the drastic decline in energy quotes. If they talk about the central tendency of inflation, they will talk about core PCE (and ignore the question of whether the slowdown in medical care which shows up there is illusory or transitory). If pressed, they may mention core CPI, which is still below target because of the “tail” categories.

You will not hear them talk about Median CPI at 2.5% and rising.

Inflation is headed higher. How much higher, and how quickly, depends on several factors such as how quickly the Fed raises rates (I have already said this is unlikely, but note that I think raising rates would initially accelerate inflation) and whether bank lending slows for reasons unrelated to monetary policy. But the sign is clear. Inflation is headed higher.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

September 16, 2015 Leave a comment

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments. And sign up to receive notice when my book is published! The title of the book is What’s Wrong with Money?: The Biggest Bubble of All – and How to Invest with it in Mind, and if you would like to be on the notification list to receive an email when the book is published, simply send an email to

Also note that I have been invited to be a guest on “What’d You Miss?” today at 4pm ET. Catch it!

  • Core CPI +0.1%, but y/y stays at +1.8% as it was a “soft” 0.1%. Specifically 0.07%, weaker than expected.
  • Core services remains +2.6%; core goods -0.5% y/y.
  • The -0.5% drag in core goods remains about what we can expect from the dollar’s current strength.
  • But remember core goods is the smaller part of core inflation (and the more volatile part).
  • Bottom line on Fed has been: plenty of argument either way. This number doesn’t affect the argument either way. Doves will be doves.
  • No idea if Fed hikes tomorrow, but SHOULD have removed extraordinary accommodation when extraordinary risks were past. Years ago.
  • Speaking of housing: Primary rents 3.62% from 3.56%; OER at 3.02% from 3.00%. This acceleration will continue.
  • Lodging away from home is a small piece (0.8% of total CPI) but always fascinates me. 1.7% y/y versus 5.7% six months ago.
  • Medical care was unch, 2.47% vs 2.49%, but pharmaceuticals was 3.5% vs 3.2% while professional services 1.7% vs 2.1%.
  • The weakness in medical care continues to be the main story holding down core vs median, since 2013.
  • Motor fuel of course a big drag on headline, but New and used motor vehicles also still weak (a dollar effect): -0.1% vs +0.2%.
  • I actually think Median stands a decent chance of an 0.2% month, based on my back-of-the-envelope calculation.
  • If I am right, then Median may be at the highest level since the crisis ended. Currently 2.28%; 2012 high was 2.38%.
  • We won’t know for a few hours and my calculator doesn’t seasonally adjust the regional housing indexes so don’t take that to the bank.
  • But even if median just stays at 2.3%, that’s consistent with PCE inflation being at the Fed’s target.
  • Really looking forward to this: On Bloomberg TV at 4pm ET with Joe and Alix.
  • Good time to mention my book “What’s Wrong with Money: The Biggest Bubble of All” due out in Feb. Can preorder:
  • We don’t even have cover art yet! But the manuscript is done.
  • Much more interesting discussion [than OER] is medical care. MUCH harder to measure than OER, because consumers don’t pay for it directly.
  • We all know insurance costs are going up, but part of this is a price effect and part is a utilization effect.
  • Part of the effect of the ACA is to get people to consume less health care by making them pay for smaller costs directly.
  • …of course, that lessens overall welfare since your tradeoffs are worse. But I don’t want to get too ‘inside baseball’ in 140 char.
  • BTW, it occurs to me I never mentioned y/y core CPI is 1.83% from 1.80%, so it rose a smidge even though a weak core #.

There wasn’t a lot that was new or different in this figure. Housing continues to be the main strain on consumer budgets, as housing costs continue to rise and, given the rise in housing prices generally, this ought to continue. On the other hand, the main drag to core continues to be in the core goods component, and this ought to continue for a while. However, I don’t believe it will intensify, so for a while core (and more importantly, median) inflation will just creep up gradually. At some point, core goods will revert higher, and at that point core inflation will move with more alacrity. The timing on this appears somewhat far off, however.

That said, two other points need to be made today.

The first point is that the Federal Reserve will either raise rates tomorrow, or they will not, and this number has virtually no bearing on that. This Fed does not care very much about inflation, which is why they focus on a number (core PCE) which is not only the softest of the available series but also currently is very clearly too low based on a number of temporary effects. Core PCE has a lot to recommend it theoretically. But myopic focus on it (and any discussion at all of headline inflation, which is near zero only because of the oil price crash) can only mean that Federal Reserve policymakers are biased to be doves. But we already knew that. Moreover, if the Fed raises rates tomorrow and does it without removing the quantities of excess reserves in the system, they really aren’t doing much. At least, not much that is helpful.

The second point is that the inflation market continues to price dramatically different inflation over the next few years than we are likely to get. Either energy prices are going to continue to crash – in which case buoyant core inflation will still result in low headline inflation, which is what trades in the market – or they are going to stop crashing, in which case inflation expectations are far too low. There is virtually no chance that core inflation declines any time soon. I can make a case that core will only converge to near median, and then go flat, but unless housing collapses suddenly and unexpectedly core inflation is not going lower. (Of course, one-off effects like the medical care effect can still pervert the core numbers from time to time, which is why I focus on median, but this is inherently difficult to forecast and the one-off effects of course might also be in the upward direction).

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

August 19, 2015 2 comments

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments. And sign up to receive notice when my book is published! The title of the book is What’s Wrong with Money?: The Biggest Bubble of All – and How to Invest with it in Mind, and if you would like to be on the notification list to receive an email when the book is published, simply send an email to

  • core CPI+0.13%, softer than expected. Core y/y rose from 1.77% to 1.80% due to soft year-ago comparison.
  • Next month we drop off an 0.05%, so we will almost surely get a core uptick. Surprising we haven’t yet. Waiting for breakdn.
  • Both primary rents and owners’ equiv accelerated slightly, Which means core EX HOUSING was actually slightly down m/m
  • core services rose to 2.6% (mostly on housing); core goods fell to -0.5% from -0.4% y/y. Same story overall.
  • Apparel accelerated to -1.64% from -1.85% y/y. Story for years in apparel was deflation; in 2011-12 prices rose>>
  • >>and looked like return to pre-90s rate of rise. Then it flattened off, and has been declining again.
  • Apparel could well be a dollar story now – it’s almost all made overseas, almost no domestic competition so dollar matters.
  • our proxy for core commodities is apparel + cars + med care commodities. all 3 decelerated. Cars went from +0.5% to 0.0% y/y.
  • sorry, Apparel actually ACCELERATED to -1.6% from -1.9%, but still negative.
  • airfares not really a story. -5.6% y/y vs -5.2% y/y. The NSA number dropped but it always drops in late summer. [Ed note: see chart below]
  • airfares was -8.5%, but it was -8.1% last july, -2.9% in 2013, -2.6% in 2012…no story there. didn’t affect core meaningfully.
  • Primary rents 3.56% from 3.53%. OEW 3.00% from 2.95%. Both will continue to rise.
  • Lodging away from home also rebounded to 2.9% y/y after a one-off plunge to 0.8% y/y last month. Household energy of course down.
  • Transportation accelerated (-6.6% y/y vs -6.9%) on small motor fuel recovery. btw, airline fares are only 0.7% of CPI, so 0.9% of core.
  • Med Care: goods were dn (drugs 3.2% vs 3.4%,equipment -0.9% vs 0.0%) but prof services up (2.1% vs 1.8%),hospital svcs dn (3.2% vs 3.5%)
  • Health insurance only +0.9% y/y vs 0.7%, but more expenditures out-of-pocket under the ACA so higher infl for those categories hurts.
  • Median (due out later) might only be +0.1% this month. I have it cuffed at 0.15% but I don’t seasonally-adjust the housing sub-components.
  • Last yr Median was +0.17% m/m, so best guess is it roughly holds steady at 2.3%.
  • I don’t see how the Fed embarks on a meaningful tightening in Sep, with global economy weaker than it has been in a couple yrs.
  • Median inflation and growth plenty strong enough to “normalize” rates but that’s not a new story.
  • I’ve been saying they should tighten for a few years but not sure why they would NOW if they didn’t in 2011.
  • But Fed doesn’t use common sense or monetarist models.It’s all DSGE;who knows what those models are saying?Depends how they calibrated.
  • FWIW our OER models diverge here. Our nominal model says pressures on core start to ebb in a few mo; our real model predicts more rise.
  • I like the real model as it makes mose sense…but it’s not tested in a real upswing.
  • US #Inflation mkt pricing: 2015 0.8%;2016 0.7%;then 1.6%, 1.7%, 1.8%, 1.9%, 2.0%, 2.1%, 2.2%, 2.3%, & 2025:2.2%.
  • …so inflation market doesn’t see inflation at the Fed’s target (about 2.2% on CPI vs 2.0% on PCE) until 2023.
  • The market is not CORRECT about that, but another reason the Fed can defer tightening if they want to. And they have always wanted to.

First, let’s start with the airfares chart. One of the early headlines was that airfares plunged by the most since some long-ago year, which held down core. Well, here is the chart of airfares, non-seasonally adjusted. You tell me whether this is unusual to have airfares fall in July.


Because this is part of a normal seasonal pattern, the year-on-year figure was only slightly lower, as I note above. And airfares are a tiny part of CPI, less than 1% of the core. This is not a story.

More important will be the median CPI. This is a much better measure of the central tendency of prices than headline or core, both of which (as averages) can be skewed by a few categories having outsized moves. Median inflation has been ticking higher (see chart below) but will probably go sideways this month.


Finally, the most important chart. There are lots of ways to model housing. If you model rents as lagged versions of the FHFA Home Price Index, or Existing Home Sales median prices, then you get one model and that model suggests that rents should begin to moderate over the next 6-12 months. Not that they will decelerate markedly, but that they will stop accelerating and therefore stop being the driving force pushing core CPI higher. But if you use those models, you have to recognize that you are calibrating over a period of very slow inflation, so that you are effectively ignoring the knock-on effect of higher inflation on rents. That is, if core inflation is around 2% and rents are 3%, then if core inflation rises to 5% you wouldn’t expect rents to be at 3%. So, you need to use a model that recognizes the interrelationship between these variables. And that sort of model implies that rents will continue to climb. Both models of Owners’ Equivalent Rent are shown in the chart below. I prefer the “real” model to the “nom” model, but we don’t know the right answer yet.


Even if OER moderates it doesn’t mean that CPI will stop rising; it just means that the story will stop being all about rents. Core goods still have a long ways to go to normalize, and that might be the next story. But for now, I am still focused on rents.

As I said, I really don’t see how the Fed can think about hiking rates in September based on the data we have seen recently. Yes, inflation is on the border of being an issue, but that has been true for a long time. In 2011, there was plenty of growth and while high rates would not have been warranted, it is hard to argue that normal rates were not called for. And yet, we got QE and more QE. This will end up being the biggest central bank error in decades, regardless of what the Fed does in September. I doubt they will hike, and if they do then it won’t be a long series of hikes. This is still a very dovish central bank, and they will get skittish very quickly if markets balk at more expensive money – which, of course, they are wont to do.

Summary of my Post-CPI Tweets

July 17, 2015 1 comment

Below is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments.

  • Core CPI +0.18%, y/y rises to 1.77%. Pretty much as-expected on the headline figures.
  • Was some market concern about a possible higher print following PPI, but there isn’t much correlation.
  • Note that the next two months of CPI will ‘drop off’ an 0.10% and an 0.05%, so we should get to 2% on core inflation by mid-September.
  • Of course the Fed’s target is ~2.25% on core CPI (since they tgt core PCE) so Fed can argue it’s still below tgt. Uptrend may concern.
  • Housing inflation on the other hand going to the moon
  • This is great chart and it’s the reason core never had a chance of entering deflation territory. & will go up. (retweeted Matthew B)


  • Housing #CPI overall just hit 2% y/y. Primary rents 3.53%. OER, which is 24% of the whole CPI, rose to 2.95% from 2.79%. Wow!
  • …our model for OER is at 3.1%, and the actual number HAD been lagging. I love it when a plan comes together.
  • So housing drove core services to +2.5% y/y, core goods -0.4%.
  • So if housing busted higher, what was the services offset? Medical care, 2.51% y/y vs 2.84% last month.
  • WSJ argued earlier this month that is expected because under Ocare people are actually spending their own money.
  • Within medical care, drugs went to 3.44% vs 4.05%, pro svcs went 1.83% from 1.58%, and hospital & related to 3.48% from 4.51%. So maybe?
  • Yes, core PCE & core CPI are going to be rising. But core PCE won’t be anywhere close to the Fed’s tgt by Sep.
  • Here is core and median CPI (the latter not out yet today) and core PCE.


  • core commodities are about where they should (eventually) be, given rally in TW$. A bit ahead of schedule though.


  • This chart means either that home prices are overextended or incomes need to catch up, or both.


  • Here is our OER model that is based on incomes. Not a tight fit but gets direction right.


  • I wondered about this when I paid $180/night for room in S. Dak. Hotel infl driven in part by fracking boom?


  • probably would fit better if I used a regional lodging index rather than national, I suspect.

The summary of today’s CPI release is that the underlying pressures remain the same, and the trends remain the same. The really interesting dynamic going forward isn’t in CPI (although at some point when core goods starts to rise again, that will be quite interested), but in how the Fed reacts to the CPI. When they meet in September, core CPI will be around 2%, a bit shy of where the Fed’s target is. But the uptrend will be clearly apparent, and core and median CPI will likely be closer to 2.5% than 2% by the end of the year.

So the interesting dynamic is this: even though inflation is below the Fed’s target, and growth isn’t great shakes, and there are risks to the global economic system in Europe and in China…will the Fed tighten in September anyway? If they do, then it will be surprising if only because the FOMC passed on many opportunities over the last five years which would have been much more accommodating (no pun intended) to a normalization of rates. Sure, if they now recognize that they should have tightened three years ago it shouldn’t color their decision today – the best time to plant a tree may have been thirty years ago, but the best time that we can actually choose from is today – but the Fed hasn’t usually been so limber in its reasoning. Especially with a very dovish makeup of the Committee, I would be surprised to see them hike rates unless inflation has surpassed their target and growth is pretty strong with global risks receding.

However, the strength of my view on that has been slipping recently. Although I think most of the Fed’s talk on this point is mere bluster, we do have to pay attention when Fed speakers – and especially the Chairman – say the same things multiple times. While Yellen has expressed only an expectation that the Fed will raise rates later this year (and we have no idea how conditional that expectation is on stronger growth, on Chinese growth, on European volatility etc, she has said this multiple times and at some point I have to conclude she means it. I still think that the odds of getting rates even up to 1% in a single series of moves is slim, but I admit the more-consistent Fed chatter is worth listening to.

Categories: CPI, Tweet Summary Tags: , ,

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

May 22, 2015 2 comments

Here is a summary of my post-CPI tweets. You can (and should!) follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments.


  • CPI Day! Exciting. The y/y for core will “drop off” +0.20% m/m from last yr, so to get core to 1.9% y/y takes +0.29 m/m this yr.
  • Consensus looks for a downtick in core to 1.7% y/y (rounding down) instead of the rounded-up 1.8% (actually 1.754%) last mo.
  • oohoooooo! Core +0.3% m/m. y/y stays at 1.8%. Checking rounding.
  • +0.256% m/m on core, so the 0.3% is mostly shock value. But y/y goes to 1.81%, no round-assist needed.
  • Headline was in line with expectations, -0.2% y/y. Big sigh of relief from dealers holding TIPS inventory left from the auction.
  • Core ex-shelter was +0.24%, biggest rise since Jan 2013. That’s important.
  • This really helps my speaking engagement next mo – a debate between pro & con inflation positions at Global Fixed Income Institute. :-)
  • More analysis coming. But Excel really hates it when you focus on another program while a big sheet is calculating…
  • It’s still core services doing all the heavy lifting. Core goods was -0.2% y/y (unch) while core services rose to 2.5% y/y.
  • Core services has been 2.4%-2.5% since August.
  • Owners’ Equivalent Rent rose to 2.77% y/y, highest since…well, a long time.
  • Thanks Excel for giving me my data back. As I said, OER was 2.77%, up from 2.69%. Primary rents frll to 3.47% from 3.53%.
  • Housing as a whole went to 2.20% y/y from 1.93%, which is huge. Some of that was household energy but ex-energy shelter was 2.67 vs 2.56
  • Or housing ex-shelter, ex-energy was 1.14% from 0.67%. Seems I am drilling a bit deep but getting housing right is very important.
  • Medical Care +2.91% from 2.46%. Big jump, but mostly repaying the inexplicable dip from Q1. Lot of this is new O’care seasonality.
  • Median is a bit of a wildcard this month. Looks like median category will be OER (South Urban), so it will depend on seasonal adj.
  • But best guess for median has been 0.2% for a while. Underlying inflation is and has been 2.0%-2.4% since 2011.
  • And reminder: it’s median that matters. Core will continue to converge upwards to it, (and I think median will go higher.)
  • None of this changes the Fed. They’re not going to hike rates for a long while. Growth is too weak and that’s all they care about.
  • For all the noise about the dual mandate, the Fed acts as if it only has one mandate: employment (which they can’t do anything about).
  • The next few monthly core figures to drop off are 0.23%, 0.14%, 0.10%, and 0.05%.
  • So, if we keep printing 0.22% on core, on the day of the Sep FOMC meeting core CPI will be 2.2% y/y, putting core PCE basically at tgt.
  • I think this is why FOMC doves have been musing about “symmetrical misses” and letting infl scoot a little higher.
  • US #Inflation mkt pricing: 2015 1.1%;2016 1.8%;then 1.8%, 2.0%, 2.0%, 2.1%, 2.2%, 2.3%, 2.4%, 2.5%, & 2025:2.4%.
  • For the record, that is the highest m/m print in core CPI since January 2008. It hasn’t printed a pure 0.3% or above since 2006.


There is no doubt that this is a stronger inflation print than the market expected. Although the 0.3% print was due to rounding (the first such print, though, since January 2013), the month/month core increase hasn’t been above 0.26% since January 2008 and it has been nearly a decade since 0.3% prints weren’t an oddity (see chart, source Bloomberg).


You can think of the CPI as being four roughly-equal pieces: Core goods, Core services ex-rents, Rents, and Food & Energy. Obviously, the first three represent Core CPI. The breakdown (source: BLS and Enduring Investments calculations) is shown below.


Note that in the tweet-stream, I referred to core services being 2.4%-2.5% since August. With the chart above, you can see that this was because both pieces were pretty flat, but that the tame performance overall of core services was because services outside of rents was declining while rents were rising. But core services ex-rents appear to have flattened out, while housing indicators suggest higher rents are still ahead (Owners’ Equivalent Rent, the bigger piece, went to 2.77%, the highest since January 2008). Core goods, too, look to have flattened out and have probably bottomed.

So the basic story is getting simpler. Housing inflation continues apace, and the moderating effects on consumers’ pocketbooks (one-time medical care effects, e.g., which are now being erased with big premium hikes) are ebbing. This merely puts Core on a course to re-converge with Median. If core inflation were to stop when it got to median, the Fed would be very happy. The chart below (Source: Bloomberg) supports the statement I made above, that median inflation has been between 2% and 2.4% since 2011. Incidentally, the chart is through March, but Median CPI was just released as I type this, at 2.2% y/y again.

median thru march

But that gentle convergence at the Fed target won’t happen. Unless the Federal Reserve acts rapidly and decisively, not to raise rates but to remove excess reserves from the banking system (and indeed, to keep rates and thereby velocity low while doing so, a mean trick indeed), inflation has but one way to go. Up. And there appears little risk that the Fed will act decisively in a hawkish fashion.

Summary of My Post-CPI Tweets

April 17, 2015 3 comments

Below you can find a recap and extension of my post-CPI tweets. You can follow me @inflation_guy or sign up for email updates to my occasional articles here. Investors with interests in this area be sure to stop by Enduring Investments.

  • Core CPI+0.23% m/m is the story, with y/y upticking to 1.754% (rounded to +1.8%). This was higher than expected, by a smidge.
  • Core services +2.4% y/y down from 2.5%. But core goods -0.2%, up from -0.5% last mo and -0.8% two months ago. Despite dollar strength!
  • Core ex-housing rose to 0.91% y/y from 0.69% at the end of 2014. Another sign core inflation has bottomed and is heading back to median.
  • The m/m rise of 0.20% in core ex-shelter was the highest since Jan 2013.
  • Primary rents 3.53% y/y from 3.54%; OER 2.693% from 2.687%. Zzzzz…story today is outside of housing, which is significant.
  • Accelerating major groups: Apparel, Transport, Med Care, Recreation (32.1% of index). Decel: Food/Bev, Housing, Educ/Comm, Other (67.9%)
  • …but again, in housing the shelter component (32.7% of overall CPI) was unch at ~3% while fuels/utilities plunged to -2.26% from flat.
  • [in response to a question “Michael we have been scratching our heads on this one… is it some impact of port strike do you think?”] @econhedge I don’t think so. But core goods was just too low. Our proxy says this is about right.
  • @econhedge w/in core goods, Medical commodities went to 4.2% from 3.9%, new cars from 0.1% to 0.3%, and Apparel to -0.5% from -0.8%.
  • @econhedge so you can argue Obamacare effect having as much impact as port strike. But it’s one month in any case. Don’t overanalyze. :-)
  • Medicinal drugs at 4.46% y/y. In mid-2013 it was flat. That was a big reason core CPI initially diverged from median. Sequester effect.
  • @econhedge Drugs 1.70%, med equip/supplies 0.08% (that’s percentage of overall CPI). 8.7% and 0.4% of core goods, respectively.
  • Median should be roughly 0.2%. I have it up 0.21% m/m and 2.22% y/y, but I don’t have the right seasonals for the regional OERs.
  • Further breakdown of medical care commodities: the biggest piece was prescription drugs, +5.74% y/y vs 5.19%. The other parts were lower.

The main headline of the story is that core inflation rose the most month-over-month since May. After a long string of sub-0.2% prints (that sometimes rounded up), this was a clean print that would annualize to 2.7% or so. And it is no fluke. The rise was broad-based, with 63% of the components at least 2% above deflation (see chart, source Enduring Investments, and keep in mind that anything energy-related is not part of that 63%) and nearly a quarter of the basket above 3%.


This is no real surprise. Median has consistently been well above core CPI, which implied some “tail categories” were dragging down core CPI. These tail categories are still there (see chart, source Enduring Investments), but less than they had been (compare to chart here). Ergo, core is converging upward to median CPI. As predicted.


The next important step in the evolution of inflation will be when median inflation turns decisively higher, which we think will happen soon. But that being said, a few more months of core inflation accelerating on a year/year basis will get the attention of the moderates on the Federal Reserve Board. I don’t think it will matter until the doves also take notice, and this is unlikely to happen when the economy is slowing, as it appears to be doing. I don’t think we will see a Fed hike this year.


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